Job Searching Through the Holidays

Job searching is one of the hardest things to do. Add in the holidays and it is recipe for headaches, heartaches, and a whole host of other ailments.

Many people see the holidays as a time to take a break, a time to be with their family and friends and to put aside their work applying for jobs, attending networking events, setting up coffee dates and lunch dates.

For others like me, it is not a time to let up. It is a time to reach out, to check back in with people I have already spoken with, to connect with old friends, to try new things or old things in new ways. It is not a time to give up, let up, or step back.

There are several motivators at work here. First, my absolute need to keep moving, keep working, keep trying. I just don’t know how to stop. Mixed into this is some FOMO (fear of missing out). I am a bit nervous that if I take a day off, that is the day I would have been connected with exactly the right person/job/situation. This is not rational, but it is part of who I am.

There is also my positive attitude driving me forward. This situation is a new adventure and is helping me to develop a new set of tools to put in my “Life Tool Belt”. I want to keep exploring. I am curious to see what all is out there. I enjoy imagining myself in different job situations, different cities, different companies. I love meeting new people and talking with them about important things. 

Finally, and on the other side of the coin, is the fact that Christmas will not look the same for my family this year. We are a very fortunate family. We like to celebrate big. The space under the tree is normally stuffed full of presents. This year, with money and the future so uncertain, we will be scaling things back. Way back. I think my kids understand – I have certainly tried to prepare them. But I don’t want this to last, and so I will continue to look for a new opportunity.

I have two recommendations for those of you looking for work/life balance while looking for work. Both suggestions came from mentors of mine who have both been in the same situation:

SUGGESTION 1: Develop a point system. It can be as simple or as complex as you would like. Assign activities different point values, and set a daily goal for how many points you need to earn. For example, you might set a daily goal of 5 points. Setting up a lunch could be one point, connecting with someone on LinkedIn could be a point, and filling out an online application could be 2 or 3 points (those things take time!). Once you have reached your daily goal, you are free to spend the rest of the day as you choose, without guilt!

SUGGESTION 2: Set a goal for work hours. This fits better for those used to working traditional hours. Get up in the morning, take a shower, and get dressed like you are going to work. Schedule time off as you normally would at work. If you need to do things during the day, schedule work hours in the evening. By treating this like a real job (as it is), you are more likely to ditch the guilt when you spend time on non-search related activities.

All of that said, I have discovered that just about NO ONE shares my desire to engage in recruiting activities this week (the week before Christmas), and I am sure that this will continue next week. Emails are going unanswered, interviews are delayed, new job listings have dried up, and no one is available for lunch. 

So this week and next, I am trying to embrace the “other side.” I am spending as much time as possible with my kids. I am playing with my delightfully mischievous puppies. I am finding fun, creative ways to enjoy the holidays. I am trying to relax and breathe and believe that there is something truly magical waiting for me in 2019.

Don’t get me wrong – I still applied for 3 jobs last night, have sent several emails this morning, and have scheduled as many coffee/lunch dates as I can. But I am also stopping to take a breath and enjoy the season.

I hope you do too! Happy holidays!!

As always….stay positive!

 

 

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1 Comment Job Searching Through the Holidays

  1. Pingback: In Praise of (Temporary) Unemployment | melindasleadership

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